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were killed. those are the headlines at this hour. america tonight is up next. you can get the latest news online at al jazeera.com. i will see you at 11:00 eastern time. >> on america tonight, now it's all in the timing. washington sends its firmest signals yet that it intends to act. >> they are watching. they want to see whether the united states and our friends mean what we say. >> back to school and adding up the risks. chicago students seek safe passage to class. >> it be glasses on the floor and the drugs. you have to walk through all of that danger and it's very carry. >>> also tonight, losing control. a burst of heat threatens to fuel a new round of california wildfires. ♪ >>> and good evening, thanks for being with us, i'm joie chen. while the timing remains a mystery, the white house laid down some clear markers about the actions against syria. both president obama and his chief diplomat, secretary of state john kerry had high confidence that the syrian government used chemical weapons against its own people and set fairly clear guidelines in place about how it intends to
claude mckay, fats waller, duke ellington. america experienced and said, we like the style of these people. they enjoyed it, adopted it, integrated it. and exploited it. the popularity of black style and culture soon spread throughout the country. it was not enough for black folks to be artistically admired. black folks wanted and demanded full participation in the social, political, and economic life of american society. that attitude set the stage for the civil rights movement of the 1950's and 1960's. on wednesday, august 28, 1963, 300,000 people -- 80% of them black -- marched on the nation's capital as did before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come -- and stood before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come. celebrating the past is good. but without a vision for the future, we will never move beyond that past. in 2008, america was ready for an intelligent and articulate black man to sit in the oval office. he brought not only his intelligence, but some swagger into the white house. the reality is
syria. >> translator: >> this is part of america's plan to divide the middle east it started with iraq and now syria and this is an israel's interest. tra*p>> translator: it happenedn iraq and maybe in syria and maybe egypt. >> reporter: the syrian government promised to defend themself against attack. the fire in syria won't stop at its borders. al jazeera, beirut. >> the tinspection team in syria could take two weeks to release its report but the u.s. will wait on findings -- will it wait on findings before launching any attack. james is at the u.n. the ambassadors of the five members of the security council on their way to a meeting. this wasn't a formal session along the horseshoe table the final court of international security. the place where historically so many decision about global war and peace have been taken. instead, the last of the arrive at a meeting of the u.s. secretary general with the ambassador of the country will take security council. the weapons inspectors have made good progress taking samples of witness statements inside syria at the sight of the chemical attac
foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. for each of us, there are days that are turning points. a day that changes our personal life, or a day that changes the nation. sometimes, very rarely, it's one and the same day. just such a day happened to me on wednesday, august 28th, 1963. i was 29 years old, the deputy director of the peace corps, with offices one block from the white house and a short walk from the lincoln memorial. that morning, largely on impulse, inspired by a friend, i joined the quarter of a million americans, people of every age and color, who had come for the march on washington. the event is now most famous for martin luther king, jr.'s "i have a cream "dream" speech, but like many of the others there, i was first transfixed by one of the other speakers, the youngest on the platform. >> brother john lewis. >> his name was john lewis. he had just been named head of sncc, the student nonviol
hand hand-out. >> awesome. >> taxpayers. >> so are all the hand-outs killing what made america great? good old fashioned hardwork? plus selling us out. government agencies making money off the private and the personal info. you won't believe what we found. and the opener of america's oldest brewery taking on big labor in a big way. and the reason job seekers on this holiday weekend. "cashin' in," working hard for you starts right now. ♪ ♪ >> eric: hi, everyone, i'm eric bolling. welcome to "cashin' in." the crew this week, wayne rogers, jonathan hoenig, michelle field, ebony k. williams. welcome, everybody. as we celebrate labor day this weekend let's open up a debate about the current state of labor in america. >> work is quickly replaced with hand-out and freebies. the recent report found in 35 states, welfare pays more than the minimum wage. that alone is driving the would-be workers to the open arm of our government. happy we feel recipient is a happy voter. what is the fall-out? welfare abusers, the takers are exploding. while the labor force, the makers are imploding. more
transformed america. she lives in williamstown, massachusetts with jim burns and their dog, roosevelt, and i know that -- [laughter] just on a personal note, for one thing, she's a great friend of the library and me as well, but james mcgreggor burns is the dean of scholars writing the first two full editions of radio vet's biography yearings ago, and he's watching the prasm later. we want to send the best to him in massachusetts. [applause] with that, pleased to introduce susan dunn. [applause] have you seen "foreign correspondence" starring herbert marshall? many of the students have not heard of al fred hitchcock or joel mccia, but you may know them. "foreign correspondent" debuted in the summer of 1940, and in the first scene, a newspaper editor asks his lackadaisical reporter, johnny jones, a question, what's your opinion of the present european crisis, mr. jones? what crisis, says the reporter, played by joel. i'm referring to the war, mr. jones. oh, that, well, to tell you the truth, i've not begin it much thought. you don't keep up with the foreign news, do you? well how would you li
of justice flickered. it never died. because they kept marching, america changed. because they marched, the civil rights law was passed. because they marched, the voting rights law was assigned. because they marched, doors of opportunity in education swung open so their daughters and sons could imagine a life for themselves beyond washing someone else's laundry or shining someone else's shoes. because they marched, city councils changed and state legislatures changed and congress changed. eventually the white house changed. [cheers and applause] because they marched, america became more free and more fair. not just for african-americans, but for women and latinos. asians and native americans. catholics, jews, and muslims. for gays, for americans with disabilities. america changed for you and for me. the entire world drew strength from that example, whether it be young people who watched from the other side of an iron curtain and would eventually tear down that wall, or the young people inside south africa would eventually end the scourge of apartheid. [cheers and applause] those are th
and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis, and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to know dr. king. i met him in 1958 when i was 18. but i first heard of him when i was 15 years old in the 10th grade. we worked together. we marched together. we got arrested together in selma, alabama. >> have you ever heard this story before? >> yes, i have. >> you have? >> i watched it on tv. >> you did? >> so you know about the sit-ins? the freedom ride? >> yeah. >> people marching for the right to vote? you know, i was on the march from selma to montgomery. i was beaten. on march 7th, 1965, a group of us, about 600 people, black and white, many young people, some people who had just left church, decided to march from
the way he saw america's potential relationship with all these middle east countries the word is reciprocity. he believed these countries should receive something in return. it wasn't good enough for the united states to function like a european colonial power and extract the resources of these countries and those countries receive nothing in return. this was alarming and disturbing to winston churchill and the british because the british had behaved in the middle east in a way that was exclusively extracted without those countries receiving much. occasionally a small number of countries receive something in return but president roosevelt had a more universal idea of reciprocity. look at saudi arabia. in saudi arabia the american oil companies were at that time by and large dividing the proceeds of the oil extraction 50/50. this was not occurring with the oil company in iran or the iraqi petroleum company which was largely dominated by the british in iraq so the british fought the american involvement in the middle east if the americans were going to use saudi arabia as a mode
: race, slavery and the troubled history of america's universities." we wrap up tonight's prime time programming at 11 p.m. eastern with the biography of charles manson. .. thank you very much for that lovely introduction. i suspect all of you know this but ladies and gentlemen, tonight you will be in the presence of a literary giant. among latin american giants, gabriel marquez is known for mesmerizing, others educate, and captivate, and then there is eduardo galeano. truth teller, galvanize her, firebrand, a writer who tells us about history, that those who inhabit the corridors of power don't want us to know more truly understand. eduardo galeano was born a commentator, it seems. by the time he was 14 he was publishing cartoons in newspapers. by 20 he was the editor of the left-wing weekly newsletter, he became the top executive of a paper of record. in 1971 at the tender age of 31 he published day hair raising indictment of north american influence on the hemisphere. the open veins of latin america. four years ago at the summit of the americas, hugo chavez hand and a copy of that
detroit, america is in big trouble. that's our show. see you next week.d show. tune in. charles: hello, everyone. i am charles payne, it is time to make some money. no more days at the beach and the stock market the toughest month of the year. i will tell you what to look out for in september. and the notion of so-called cheap stocks and the idea we play the market. the worst is the false idea of diversification. more than likely have fallen into that trap. we covered a lot this week and we will give you coverage of the week and months ahead, because it is all coming up on "making your market." stocks fell across the board today, this is not taking long heading into this holiday weekend. especially not with the uncertainty in syria. one of the worst months for stock since last may. utilities and financials led the market ler. the dow lost four and .5%, the s&p 500 lost ov 3%. still the market up easily double digits so far this year so let's get to our panel. i will never mess that up again. and this one, our friend. guys, let's talk a little bit about this month, the worst mont
. >> corporate america and the economic emerged and the republican and democratic party merged and brought in low, cheap products and offered a lot of jobs and changed america, not for the better. >> eleanor? >> i agree there's no significant labor move in the country and we really could use it. corporate america is the bull in the china shop, and china metaphor there is also meant. but when i look at the setting with amazon, if you're the owner of an independent bookstore, you're not going to like the president chose this setting. they did announce they're creating 4,000 jobs, setting up distribution centers and the phrase that's use side bricks and click. they have acknowledged that they do support some sort of an internet tax, and so there could have, on the progressive end of how it works with our tax system. jeff bazos, the genius behind amazon, is one of silicone valley, california start ups. they're getting into policy, just with facebook is hill on the way side. it's almost like another government there. in that sense, this is recognizing the future, and the future is here. >> the you app
is an example of what made america great. courage to confront hard shot and abuse, determination to move past and gratitude to a country that made it possible for anyone to succeed and discover one's self worth. .. >> she has also written articles for the "wall street journal," national tribune, los angeles times, "the weekly standard," and others. currently, ms. ma is a vice president of the advisory firm, and she's the policy adviser of the heartland institute, a free market think tank. it is my pleasure to introduce ying ma. [applause] >> thank you, all, thank you so much. rita, thank you very much for the kind introduction. i want to say thanks to all the volunteers who made this event happen, special thanks to rita for all her hard work, coordination in recent months, and, howard, thank you for having me here. it's an honor for me to tell you a bit about my book and my story, but whenever i talk about my book, i have a tendency to think of another author, and that author is president barack obama. as you may recall, the liberal media raved about barack obama's writing abilities in the 20
. aubrey has another great recipe from the culinary institute of america. >> hi, everyone. i hope you're doing well. today, we're going to make really, really easy and delicious hummus with homemade pita chips. earlier, i cut and toasted my pita... ...i squeezed the juice out of a lemon... ...and i peeled some fresh garlic. i have all of my ingredients ready. we have 2 cups of chickpeas, half a cup of olive oil. we have 2 tablespoons of tahini, which is a sesame paste that you can find in any grocery store. we have garlic. i peeled more garlic than i need, but once i do it, i can use it for the rest of the week in all of the food that i make. we also have salt and the juice of one lemon. now, all we'll have to do is put everything into the food processor... our chickpeas... olive oil... tahini... one clove of garlic, unless you like it very garlicky... lemon juice... and a pinch of salt. if you noticed earlier, i didn't salt or season the pita chips. that's because i salted the hummus. remember, salt is only optional. now we'll place it right on top. [ food processor whirs ] now unplu
made the announcement we have to act. before kerry said in front of the world the word of america is at stake. before the entire administration leaked the plan to explain exactly were it had to act. right now we are way beyond the other arguments, we are way beyond the polls. way beyond the issues, is this the best way to attack. i this it is not. the only -- >> it doesn't matter -- >> cannot be -- >> you have to listen for a second to martin dempsey if the chairman of joint chiefs of staff says to you, it doesn't matter if we go tomorrow, it doesn't matter if we go next week, we will still have an effective military strike against assad. we will hurt assad. then that open it is window to this that so many americans want to take place. >> why? there is no gap that we can hurt assad. and i don't think that the chairman of the joint chiefs is the one who decides how america should act as a way to uphold its word and strength in the region. he tells the president what to work -- what works and what doesn't. we agree it could work, depending how you design it. the question is once you
stossel. ♪ john: detroit was once the richest city in america. i was three years old and. thatas the 1950's. now it's the biggest u.s. city ever to declare bankruptcy. so what happened? our guests tonight have some clues. first, fox news reporter works in detroit and just wrote, detroit, an american autopsy. an autopsy, one examines the dead body and tries to find out what killed him. detroit isn't that exactly. what killed the trust? >> would kill the charge, racial conflict of detroit. slav kill detroit. corruption children. it seems like that is what has become the american way because detroit is not alone. what is baltimore going to do, atlanta, l.a. john: detroit is and worse shape. worse politicians, more unions. the automaker collapsed. it was in the politicians' fault. it was just the big three crashed. >> it was all of them. one industry town. we were rich. we thought it would never end. everybody put their hand in the till from management to politicians to unions. you could punch and your body will he went drinking. welew it. i know everyone is watching, not because you care, bu
security fellow with new america foundation, thank you so much for joining us this morning. as the quest considers how to respond, disturbing new images. this is video of what is said to be a fire bomb attack near a school in the northwestern part of syria. it may have contained may palm that sticks to the skin and causes severe burns. a doctor says at least seven people were killed and dozens were injuries. al jazeera cannot independently confirm those reports. >> asaad's regime has plameed the august 21st chemical attack on rebels. on friday, the syrian government called the u.s. intelligence on the use of chemical weapons fabrication and lies. keep it here to al jazeera for continuing coverage on the crisis in syria, you can also stay up to date on our website aljazeera.com. children in unmarked graves may finally have their stories told. exhume makeses are underway in an attempt to uncover their long held secrets. beautiful weather in yosemite national park, we will tell you why that sunshine is not helping firefighters dealing with a run away wild fire burning the national treasure.
>>> good morning, america. breaking overnight, u.n. weapons inspectors leave syria. opening the window for a strike. >>> u.s. warships armed with hundreds of tomahawk cruise missiles, now in place. >> we are looking at the possibility of a limited, narrow act. >> all this, while we're hearing about a new threat to america on the home front. >>> shot at school. a high school thrown into chaos, after a student is shot during a fire drill. >> a student has been hit. >> it's the second terrifying shooting in a school in two weeks. and you'll hear another hero's story that may have kept hundreds of students safe. >>> busted. lamar odom, star of the nba and reality tv, arrested for drunk driving. amid rumors of drug and marital problems, is this a cry for help from khloe kardashian's husband? >>> and honest answer. an ex-con allegedly takes a taxi to try to rob three banks in a row before he's nabbed. and this morning, he has a very funny exit line. >> are you sorry you did it? >> no. i'm sorry i got caught. >> got to love an honest criminal. >>> good morning. and happy labor day
. almost every day virtually every company missed the top line. corporate america crafty, they find a way to make the bottom line. does not take away the legitimacy of these earnings? >> to some degree we would like to see the bottom line improvement with topline growth and evtually you will have to go there. as you well know, corporate earnings are at an all-time high, revenues are at an all-time high, are we disappointed with the growth rate? yeah, a little bit. we need a little bit of time to go up from here. it will take continued help from the consumer, capital out of corporate america, continue less bad newsut of europe and some combing in the emerging market especially china. we will get a mix of that to get some better revenue growth. it will not set any records, but we will get a little better. charles: we saw some answers to your china part there. i think that is getting better. a lot has that europe is going pretty good at a lot of diverse sectors. i think the question, bob, the u.s. consumer has not taken the bait. they have learned a very powerful less, putting off debt and t
in the world. it is also profoundly about who we are. we are the united states of america. we are the country that has tried not always successfully but always tried to honor a set of universal values around which we have organized our lives and our aspirations. >> he went on to say the president said in syria will dictate how future regimes treat their people. as of right now president obama says no final decision has been made. >> i have said before and i meant what i said. the world has a nomination to make sure that we maintain the norm against the use of chemical weapons. i have not made a final decision about various actions that might be taken to help enforce that norm. >> a new poll says 80% of americans believe that president obama should seek congressional approval before making decisions on whether or not to enter been. dennis kucinich tweeted -- also the obama administration released document supporting allegations that the regime was responsible for the chemical attack that killed 1400 29 civilians including 426 children. that same attack sickened over 3600 people. i spoke with t
. coal is pretty simple stuff. if you can't burn it in america, put it on a train, ship it over to china or india. so, we got market forces. and against that we have to marshal intelligence and collaboration and political response, because this stuff is serious. and the fact that people aren't worried about it and don't talk about it doesn't mean it isn't serious. and that's the insidious character of this -- of this challenge, that some people know about it, 90, 97% of the scientists who deal in climate science all agree that when it comes to doing something it takes leadership. and not just political leadership, but business leadership, church leadership, academic leadership. and that's the context, i believe, in which you have come together. you're focusing on solar energy. that's a big piece. there's plenty of sun out there to take care of our energy. it's going to take time. it's going to take technology. it's going to take scientific breakthroughs, research, and development. and it's going to take storage. and it's going to take various insebastianvv stifle. just in california you
to those who want to attack the country. but who will get help and who will get hurt if america intervenes? and more than a million syrian children most under 11 are now refugees. the major humanitarian crisis, and what's next. >>> plus california losing money from the movie industry. and google and the world brain. the internet giant plants to put every book in the world online. >>> hello, in consider this, there are grave concerns. a threat to national security and a challenge to the world. >> it increases the risk of chemical weapons, and what we use of the future and it falls in the hands of terrorist who is might use them against us. >> reporter: and as secretary of state said the syrian president should be punished for what he called crime against humanity. >> we need to ask what is the risk of doing nothing? [ explosion ] >> reporter: the u.s. must respond, the obama administration says, to prevent more death in syria, and to send a message to the syrian government and others that they can't get away with using chemical weapons against its people but limited strikes wouldn't topple
driving range. no wonder volt is america's best-selling plug-in. that's american ingenuity to find new roads. ♪ the 2013 volt. charge ahead of the rest in the hov lane. ♪ >>> at this hour, it's being reported president obama is consulting with preparation and u.k. leaders, but he has not made a decision. so will the u.s. go it alone in syria. john bolton joins us. it looks like it will be president obama and maybe the president of france at this point. things look rather bleak in terms of getting allies. >> we don't know that the french are actually going to be using military assets. they will be cheering us on perhaps. but as of now it will be essentially a united states operation. so you have the obama administration with people like joe biden and john kerry who spent years criticizing the bush administration for its unilateralism, doing something that truly is unilateral as opposed to things done in the bush administration likely the overthrow of saddam hussein that had dozens of coalition members along with it. >> what's the difference between doing it this way and drop ago dro
effectively. >> greta: how america is perceived in the world matters, you agree? >> exactly. >> greta: in light of the fact that the president has gotten himself boxed in on this one by his red line and saber rattling and now he can't get anyone to help him. can we help him out of this one before we go? can you think some way where he can extricate himself, retain credibility of the world so we don't look like headlines tomorrow syria scared us and we ran away with the tail between our legs? how do we get out of this. >> his credibility is irrepair shall damaged. >> he represents the united states. >> i don't think it's reparable. i think what we have to do now is explain to the rest of the world that basically we are in a 1200 day period when the president is not going to be effective but that that doesn't mean that america can't be reinstated into its proper place once you get a real president in washington. i don't think you can look at a president like this. he is not going to change in the last 1200 days. it's just going to get worse. >> greta: you should see the headlines all ov
america is perceived in the world matters, you agree? >> yes. >> in light of the fact the president is boxed in on this by his red line, now he can't get anyone to help him, can you help him out of this? is there a way to extricate himself, retain credibility in the world so we don't read headlines that syria scared us, we ran away with a tail between the legs? how do we get out of this? >> his credibility is irrepairably damaged. >> he represents the united states. we're all going to live with his credibility. >> i don't think it is repairable. what we have to do is explain to the rest of the world that basically we're in a 1200 day period when the president is not going to be effective, but that doesn't mean that america can't be reinstated into its proper place once you get a real president in washington. i don't think you can -- you look at a president like this, he's not going to change in the last 1200 days, it is just going to get worse. >> the headlines all over the middle east that i looked at, you know, no matter how much you exaggerat exaggerated, and wrong, they're still
of course, america's longest standing ally, great britain, declined to join the coalition against syria. we're here with connie mack and dennis kucinich. thanks for joining us. congressman mack, the layers upon layers of irony here, this president-elected on a platform against unilateral military action, running basically against the legacy of a president who used wmd to justify a war. we're now in the very same position. bittersweet for you watching it? >> it's hard to say bittersweet because there's so much on the line. our national security is on the line. the integrity and the belief system of our country is on the line. and president obama has been a disaster when it comes to foreign policy. if you just look at this one case, he talks about a red line. today, secreta secretary kerry e case for crossing that red line and then basically, surrender. he has been a contradiction to himself and this has made america less safe around the world. you know, as an american, i'm appalled that we are now looked around the world and our enemies are laughing at us. they don't think we have any credib
to the credible in the future interests of the united states of america and our allies. it matters, because a lot of other countries whose policy is challenged these international norms are watching. they are watching. they want to see whether the united states and our friends mean what we say. >> apparently not. defense secretary hague p spokesman george little tweeted the following. "support decision on congressional authorization for use of force in syria. agrees we cannot turn blind eye to syrian, cw, chemical weapons use, already there are indications that assad is moving around the delivery systems for those chemical weapons. he will be hiding them in civilian areas. they are mobile. it is going to make targeting very difficult in the next ten days when a decision is finally taken. >> that brings me to my next question for you, jennifer. talking about targeting become more difficult. the effectiveness of any eventual strike. how will this delay in terms of what the speng saying actually affect that? >> well, i'm told from pentagon officials it will make it more complex but is still manageab
, they are trying to place in america in the important role of history. this is where they would have dinner. they would have a chance to meet one another, conversed socially and casually, and then they might be invited to dine in the dining room. after supper, the ladies would then adjourn back into the drawing room. maybe they would serve some coffee and tea. this was the social center of the house. if you were an invited guest of the madisons or part of the intimate circle of family or friends, you would be invited into the dining room from the drawing room. and here, dolly madison would in an unusual setting for the timeframe set at the head of the table and her husband, james, would sit at the center of the table. dolly would direct in, it -- with direct the conversation and james would be able to engage in intimate conversation with the people immediately to his right and left. this table today is that for eight people, but there could be as many as 20 people served in the dining room. that would not be unusual. and indeed, dolly madison considered dining at maag pier to be so much mor
an people there seem to have little appetite for any action by the west. >> translator: this is america's plan the to divide the middle east. this is in israel's interest. it might happen in syria and maybe even egypt. >> reporter: it didn't say how put there are those who have warned what assad has repeatedly said the fire in fire in syria won't stop at its boarders. al jazeera, beirut. >> join us now is the professor of political science of the university of chicago. give me your sense of the reaction and the region if the united states launches an attack. >> it's important to understand that the medium person in the mid the east that is the medium voter if you would is already deeply skeptical of american motives. iraq certainly pushed the medium position of the average person of the middle east from modest skepticism of american motives to deep skepticism. what happened is with the passing, the obama administration lost the brits, it lost the germans and also lost the russians, chinese and you see the more this becomes unilateral american american action the more skepticism there's
's right. we want our lawmakers at home to act in the best interest of people in america. when we have bahrain, libya, china that own large amount of the debt. it limits the ability to act in the self-interest of the american people. that is concerning here. >> the focus on the debt is less interest than focus on spending. it's the spending that bothers you more than the debt. >> hilton freeman was right in the day when he said he would rather have $1 trillion budget in deficit than $2 trillion budget in balance. withdrawing resources from the economy. we are better off with a vibrant economy. it makes for vibrant defense. >> david: even john tandy can agree with the debt part of that issue, right? >> i don't know there. if china and russia sell our debt they hurt china and russia more than the united states. i am with steve. i'd rather have debt than balanced budget with $4 trillion. i never understood the g.o.p. worship of that. last word for libertarian. thank you, folks. up next, now the nsa is getting naughty! new report saying some agent workers are spying on their lovers. what h
at great america in santa clara where the idea of a staycation has taken on new meaning in light of the bay bridge closure. >> reporter: tomorrow california's great america will be packed. the theme park and other area attractions are hoping to get a few extra visitors thanks to the bridge closure, people who decide they'd rather sit on rides than in traffic. not just to be near the board walk and the beach, but to be away from the bridge. >> when we remembered the bay bridge was closed, we planned to come away from there. >> reporter: the family decided they just didn't want to risk being tied up in traffic. >> we had decided because the weather was nice that maybe we should go the opposite way and just kind of stay away. >> reporter: the bay bridge closure is keeping many south bay residents close to home . labor day weekend may be even busier. the chamber of commerce calls that good news. >> we love a little staycation. it keeps the locals local. there's all kinds of things to do this weekend. the circus is in town. there's another event called the bacon festival. >> reporter: he's going
the scenes at our evolving world. techknow - ideas, invention, life. america. >>> welcome back. the last of the u.n. chemical weapons inspectors have left syria can and have driven across the border to beirut in neighboring lebanon. the department describes the chemical weapon attack as a challenge for world. he's considering a narrative response. six people died in protest on friday. 190 others were wounded. back to our top story now the crisis in syria. joining me live in london. he's editor and chief. president obama described the suspected chemical weapons attack in syria as a challenge to the world. is it a challenge to the world? >> no. it is a challenge in the least. it is a challenge to oh the syrian, hezbollah and in a way russia. what he's going to achieve by this narrow ma. -rb mmanipulative fight,when prn 1998 as revenge for naorobi, what happened is osama took revenge three years later. we don't know what will happen after this narrow strike as president obama characterizes. the danger is coming. >> why do you think america is doing this? >> did obam ta* paint himself in a c
these and we don't need the america's cup. nonprofits don't care about america's cup and the kaiser increase and taking money out of the general fund also we don't care about that and please give us the 4%. [applause] >> hi my name is kaitlyn and a researcher at seiu 10 to one representing nonprofits in san francisco. this is necessary for nonprofits to stay afloat and the city can afford it. we ended last year with a $300 million surplus and controller surplus this year. furthermore the mayor's budget didn't have this operations for contractual services will amount to 13.four increase from last year. an analysis we put together identifies budget savings. i will share with you some highlights. the mayor's budget includes total appropriations to the general fund reserve of $76 million. the board can reduce appropriations to budget reserves by $15 million still leaving $61 million in appropriations. in the two years ending last june the city averaged $64 million in unspent appropriations for services and supplies. the board could re-appropriate 16 of the $64 million in unspent prior yea
. >> we have this, in my view, race-based partisan gridlock that denies the possibilities that america can do what we proved we could do in the 60s, which is tackle our toughest problem. >> brown: and we remember seamus heaney-- the nobel-prize winning poet who died today in his native ireland. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the obama administration today laid out its case, in detail, that the syrian government used chemical weapons on its own people last week. secretary of state john kerry minced no words in a blunt accounting of the attack. and,
for have having us. >> your impressions? >> 50 years ago, god spoke to america through a man. the baton has been passed to a new generation. not just a man, but a new generation and challenge all of us to do something to get back to a dream, to push past being democrat or republican, red state, blue state, but we're all americans and there was a message for america today and i think the important thing, angela, 50 years ago, the president of the united states hid in the white house and wouldn't talk to them. today, three presidents spoke to america and two others wanted to be there but couldn't be there because of health challenges. >> i think we have come a long way but we have a long way to go. we have equal opportunity on paper but do we have equal access? we have the first black president and first black attorney general. i'm from mississippi and my father worked heavily to dissect regate schools in mississippi. my mother didn't have a black high school. my father had to build it. now we have education and equality. but is there a level playing field today? >> as the reverend jesse jack
water to vineyards in the caneros wine region. water is set to flow this fall. >>> the america's cup finals are just over a week away. lawrence scott explains there's plenty of sailing on the bay. the young guns have been given wings on their own catamarans. >> america is set to face the emirates team. the summer of racing turns its attention to sailing's next wave with the red bull youth america's cup. these are the same boats used during last year's world cup series on the bay. the sailors representing the american teams are expecting the very best out of the international competition. >> all the teams are top sailors. there are a few really good teams from around the world. >> each team has strong individual talent. there's olympic medallists in the field. it will be a tough regatta. the 1845s are physically demanding. everybody has been working hard in the gym and are fit and ready to go. >> there are six sailors from 19 to 24. there's a nationality rule. they're ready to show their stuff knowing this is the pathway to be aboard a boat in the pursuit for the america's cup. they s
out why, in the inner city neighborhoods of obama's america, life for so many young african american men continues to be a fight for survival. (crowd applause) >> and we know that it's these crimes that gave us a bad reputation as a dangerous place and, for too long, instilled the deep-seated fear that drove families away. >> baltimore's mayor stephanie rawlings-blake is delivering her annual state of the city address. >> it's not time to celebrate. >> her words are combative. the population of baltimore -the largest city in the state of maryland - has been shrinking for decades. mayor rawlings-blake wants to grow it again by 10,000 families within the next 10 years. >> let there be no doubt: the state of our city is now better, safer, and stronger. (crowd applause) >> for all the talk of declining crime rates, baltimore is still one of the deadliest cities in the united states. >> are they still talking about it? >> it's 1:45 pm and a man has been shot. >> we've just heard about another shooting incident in the city baltimore so we're on our way to the crime scene now. we've been li
from legos to amsterdam and attended to ignite a bomb en route to america. from that attempted attack, we learned that relevant information possessed by u.s. customs and border protection needed to be available overseas at the last point of departure for the united states. we fixed that. we learned that our adversaries were moving to nonmetallic devices. we adapted our screening technology and tactics to counter that. and we learned that a single vulnerability in any part of the aviation system can make everyone connected to it vulnerable. since we don't control security at foreign airports, we have to work even more closely with international partners to raise the overall security of the system. we did that. shortly after the christmas day plot, i launched a worldwide initiative to make these needed changes in close collaboration with our strongest allies. i am proud to say that i october of 2010, this effort led to 190 countries signing onto an historic agreement to improve aviation security, standards, and technology and information sharing. i have had the chance to visit many of t
become that america? i do not believe that is the america that we are. we need to stand people up and say true patriots want people to be able to go and vote because that is how we change all of these other things. [applause] >> all right! all right! >> we would like to get to questions but i think we all been inspired by these remarks from people i have enormous respect for and they focus primarily on a very important and until recent years not sufficiently discussed national problem. i would like to bring it back as barbara asked me to to the difference of columbia because it is instructive and teaches the same lessons you learned and in part because there's a movement in which each of you will play a part if you live here and live in the area and went to help us, first thing to say is many people understood this. into a few weeks ago when a report was issued that we commissioned with the help of five distinguished judges and the assistance -- a lot of people did not understand the dimensions of the inequality the criminal justice system and the district was visiting upon our african-am
it matters here if nothing is done. >> uma: fleet awading word from president obama. if america launches an attack. we will largely go it alon, as the international community stands mostly silent. the white house says intel shows with high confidence bashar assad, a man they call a thug and murder gassed his own people including hundreds of children. hello, i'm uma pemmaraju. america's news headquarters live from the nation's capital starts right now. ♪ ♪ >> uma: we begin with live coverage in latest development of the syrian crisis. a team of military experts and analysts, including colonel oliver north on how the mission may unfold. house foreign affairs member, iliana ross layton will join us for more on the debate whether the president needs the okay from congress before he moves ahead with the military strike. live reports on what is happening on the ground on syria from connor powell, molly henneberg. we have coverage and breaking news with conor powell. >> reporter: the u.n. inspectors left syria today wrapping up a four-day trip. they are investigating claims of a chemical wh
author of dilutions of power and anthony gregory author of the power of habeas corpus in america talked about the protection of civil liberties in the u.s. since 9/11. it's about an hour and 40 minutes. good morning everybody. welcome. it is a tremendous honor to share the stage with bob and anthony who are two of my favorite people and i admire their work enormously. this is a huge topic we have to cover tonight. there are a lot of aspect and it's going to be a challenge to be able to cover some of those. i have warned both bob and anthony that i will be holding them to tight schedules so we can get through it and we will have plenty of time for your questions and we want to have a good discussion following. in your association goes back many years and it's been fruitful starting with the production of this book crisis and the episodes in the growth of american government pity it was first published by oxford university press in 1987 and remained in print ever since. we were very honored to be able to issue the 21st anniversary edition last year and your work has certainly informed a l
. >> we are the united states of america. we cannot and must not turn a blind eye to what happened in damascus. on the ashes of the world war we built an international order and enforced the rules that gave it means, and we did so because we believed that the rights of individuals to live in peace and dignity depends on the spochbts nations. responsibilities of nations.t's : [ all ] who's new in the fridge! i help support bones... [ ding! ] ...the immune system... [ ding! ] ...heart health... [ ding! ] ...and muscles. [ ding! ] that can only be ensure complete! [ female announcer ] the four-in-one nutrition of ensure complete. a simple choice to help u eat right. [ major nutrition ] ] the fnutrition in charge. of ensure complete. do you mind grabbing my phone and opening the capital one purchase eraser? i need to redeem some venture miles before my demise. okay. it's easy to erase any recent travel expense i want. just pick that flight right there. mmm hmmm. give it a few taps, and...it's taken care of. this is pretty easy, and i see it works on hotels too. you bet. now if you like
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